Tax Tips for Summer Jobs from Georgen Scarborough

When you think of your summer job, or if you’re starting as an entrepreneur, taxes might not be at the top of your priority list, so here are tax tips that you need to keep in mind. This guide from Georgen Scarborough Associates, PC will help you to make the most out of your summer earnings without getting into hot water with the taxman.

Tax Tips for Summer Jobs and Entrepreneurs from Accounting Service Experts summer

Understand your type of income 

How your income is classified will have a significant effect on your taxes, so it is essential to understand whether you are self-employed, or if a business or company actually employs you. 

There are many forms of self-employment, including being an independent contract worker that performs services such as babysitting, cleaning services, dog walking and many more. Skilled workers such as writers, photographers and designers can also be self-employed as freelancers. The basic premise of self-employment is that you have the power to decide on work you accept, clients you want to work with and the terms of the contract. 

If you’re self-employed, your income will be reported on Schedule C or Schedule C-EZ (profit or loss from business). Self-employed taxpayers can claim business expenses that you may not even be aware of, and that differ from industry to industry. That is precisely why you need the services of a certified public accountant who knows the rules and understands the laws surrounding tax expenses and claims for different industries. 

If you are an employee of a business, your employer will deduct tax from your paycheck, instead of you having to pay estimated taxes to the IRS every year. 

Reporting Income 

Regardless of your employment status (whether you are self-employed, or employed by a company), you will have to report income from all sources on your tax return. There is a threshold for income that you need to cross before you start paying taxes, but even if you don’t cross the limit, you still need to file a tax return. When reporting your income, remember to include income from any side jobs, self-employment opportunities as well as formal employment. 

A source of income that is often overlooked is barter income. This is a form of income where you are paid in goods or services in exchange for the work that you do. For example, if you spend time teaching someone’s child to swim, and they give you a gift card to get your car washed at their car wash business, it is considered income from self-employment and needs to be reported. 

File your tax return 

You should always file a tax return, no matter your income. Sometimes, your income won’t exceed the minimum gross that is set for filing requirements, but even in such an event, you may still want to file if taxes have been withheld from your pay. Your tax return may entitle you to claim money back, or it generates a tax refund if you’re eligible for a refundable tax credit such as the Earned Income Tax Credit or the American Opportunity Tax Credit. 

Although you need not know all the tax rules, if you are self-employed or an independent contractor, you need to keep a record of your income and expenses such as mileage, and materials purchased to perform your job. To make it simple, use a service such as QuickBooks so your information can be exported at tax time.

For more tax tips and information on your summer job taxes, contact accounting service experts, Georgen Scarborough Associates, PC. today.

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